First Look at The Data

First Look at The Data

Over the last two months, our OPEnS Data logging hub in the HJ Andrews forest has relayed over 100,000 data points to our Google Spreadsheet through the transmission protocol below. This post will provide a brief look at some interesting trends found within our dataset. 

Picking the Right Feather for You

Picking the Right Feather for You

As our projects continue to evolve alongside with the advances of technology it is important to keep the OPEnS lab up to date with the latest and greatest prototyping technologies at our disposal. There is no example greater than that of the microprocessor. This post will explore two of the most advanced, widely available microprocessors on the market today. 

Evaluating the TCS34725

Evaluating the TCS34725

An RGB light sensor we evaluated for use in the Evaporometer project.  This sensor measures RGB, color temperature, lumens, and visible light spectrum, and has features that won't necessarily be useful for our project, but are still worth documenting in this post.

Some Useful Diagrams Illustrating Evaporometer Processes

Some Useful Diagrams Illustrating Evaporometer Processes

So far we have used this series of blogposts to discuss a lot of the technical details about how certain processes are happening within the Evaporometer Transmitter and Receiver.  A series of diagrams has been made to help visualize how everything comes together.  First will be a diagram showing how all the sensors are connected to the Feather 32u4 and battery, followed by two flowcharts illustrating how abstract environmental conditions are transformed into the data logged in our spreadsheet.

Data Logging Using The Ethernet Featherwing

Data Logging Using The Ethernet Featherwing

For the past several weeks the primary focus of myself and the other undergraduate researchers at the OPEnS Lab has been to get a working, deployable prototype of an Evaporometer (link here) sensor for use for a partner research group. This project required numerous data transmission protocols and untimely it is our hope to add remote data-logging capabilities using the Ethernet Feathering.  

Working with the "Internet" for the Internet of Agriculture

Working with the "Internet" for the Internet of Agriculture

WiFi Data Logging

For the last few weeks, I have been working on using an Arduino Uno and a couple different ESP8266 WiFi modules for the purpose of logging sensor data in real time to a Google sheet and develop a network Gateway for all of our sensor devices.

Nordic RF shields for Adafruit ProTrinket

This post provides an update on the near-range (up to 100m) RF branch of the Internet of Agriculture Project. New PCB design makes an improvement on a general-purpose, opensource, plug-n-play wireless sensor kit.

Moving on to Smaller and Better Things

Moving on to Smaller and Better Things

As this project continues to develop, it is time to begin looking to add a more practical means of implementing these systems into the environment in a small and user-friendly package. The problem? The Arduino Uno is an excellent prototyping microcontroller, it's easy to work with, has several built-in functions with many pins ready to be used, however, this ease of use and functionality comes at the cost of a bulky, power-hungry micro controller that likely can do much more than you need it to. The solution? The Adafruit (3 Volt) Pro Trinket.

What's Up with the LoRa Devices

This post describes all progress up to this point and the integration of LoRa communication into the currently in progress Evaporometer project.

Coding with the nRF08001 Chip and Other Evils

Coding with the nRF08001 Chip and Other Evils

After concluding testing on basic functionality earlier this week with positive results , it was time to dig into the real work... developing a protocol that would allow this Bluetooth LE breakout board to be used to transmit sensor data in a convenient and uniform way across the "Internet Of Agriculture" project . In addition, a second nRF08001 module was set up, and experimenting with two modules began.

ESP 8266 and IFTTT

This post will discuss the use of third party API, IFTTT as a possible means for recording data. 

Getting Started with the nRF08001 Bluetooth LE chip

Getting Started with the nRF08001 Bluetooth LE chip

Initial setup for this project began early this week starting with soldering header pins onto the nRF08001 Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) breakout board so that a physical connection could be made with an Arduino Uno module to begin testing. This  post will discuss the process in detail. 

Testing the range of LoRa radio breakouts

Testing the range of LoRa radio breakouts

Today I confirmed that the range of the LoRa devices is at least 1-2 km; the documented range on Adafruit's website is 2km line of sight in an open area.  I took a walk and brought along one LoRa radio to the far west side of campus.  

Progress with LoRa Transmitter/Receiver

In this blog post we go over how to we assembled the LoRa transmitter and receiver.  We include instructions on how to set up the Arduino IDE as well as the code for our test devices.

Logging data on Adafruit IO

Today I finally succeeded in getting “data” (arbitrary numbers that I either hardcoded or looped through) from the Arduino through the ESP and to Adafruit IO.

Working with Adafruit RFM9x (LoRa) Radio Transceiver Modules

Working with Adafruit RFM9x (LoRa) Radio Transceiver Modules

LoRa is a Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) hardware set for creating long range (2km to 10s of kilometers) star or star-of-star networks. OPEnS Lab is evaluating LoRa for on of it's 4 Internet of Ag communication options (others being close-range RF (100m), WiFi, and GSM).

In this blog, one of our URSA Engage research students (Marissa K) got the LoRa radios up and running using this Adafruit tutorial. Below, she will detail what she had to do and modify to get this working with the RFM96W 433MHz breakout board - along with accompanying example code. These cost only $20.